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20121205
20121213
STATION
KQED (PBS) 35
LANGUAGE
English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 7:00pm PST
. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one that we want to make a dent in. >> reporter: lowering the number of infections is also good for the hospital's financial health. >> it increases length of stay. it doubles the cost of many operations. we're not reimbursed the same way that we used to for hospital-acquired infections. >> reporter: so the hospital tried an experiment. it put cameras at the entrance to patient rooms in its intensive care unit and tallied how many times workers followed hand hygiene procedures. the compliance rate was less than 10%. but once the hospital started posting the results for the shift publicly, the rate skyrocket
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 12:00am PST
the amount of technology. and in the end i think technology and innovation are the competitive advantage. we've got a good global footprint. we're in 140 countries. and we've got these deep relationships with customers so i think it's portfolio, technology, customers and real innovation around services and globalization and that's really where the pane is today. >> rose: one thing you're doing is something called the industrial internet. "businessweek" has a piece on that on the newsstand now. what is that and why is that so important to industry in the future? >> i think every industrial company now with sensor technology and software technology has to think about the analytical way around their products. so a jet engine or m.r.i. scanner or gas turbine creates terra bytes of data. usage data. if we could model a jet engine that saves 1% fuel burn every year, that save it is industry $2 billion. that's a lot of money for our customers and we're trying to take the analyticals as expects and restructure in the a way that benefits our customers. if you think about social media, it was about co
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 7:00pm PST
technology is changing and regulations have a hard time susie keeping up with it. we see it with high frequency trading for instance and how companies disseminate information using social media getting it out argue me to more people faster than what a traditional press release or sec filing. so we'll have to see how this one plays out. that stock did not move much today on the notice although we did have plenty other movement. let's get going with our market focus here. as we saw the influence of apple that it can have on the broad market really continue today. the jobs data helped the s&p 500 start in the green but the early gains disappeared as apple shares sank. the index was able to climb positive in the afternoon to finish up a 0.03%. trading volume slowed. 605 million on the big board. 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. the materials and financials gained 0.08%. the energy sector was up 0.07%. technology was the big drag, thanks once again to apple. over the past week apple has gone from almost $600 per share to $533, down about 9%. with the sell-off apple is about $8 above its most rec
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 4:00pm PST
technology, so we are summoning the north the nextbassador arabout step. >> no. 3 of's ambassador headed to london for stern warnings, -- north korea's ambassador headed to london for stern warnings. it is already isolated. its main ally, china, is unlikely to let you in impose tough new sanctions, so it will probably continue to develop rockets and bombs. -- china is unlikely to let the un impose tough new sanctions, so it will probably continue to develop rockets and bombs. >> i spoke to victor, the fellow for strategical international studies. victor, we have become used to these north korean launches not working. how worried are you by the successful one? >> i think it was definitely a surprise. i think the general view was that they tried so many times and failed, with the last one being the most spectacular failure. this was a successful launch in which they demonstrated the ability to lift a payload into orbit, which suggests they have long-range ballistic missile technology, and that is a big step they have made. >> does it give north korea more clout when it comes to possible ne
PBS
Dec 8, 2012 12:00am PST
on everything from the disruptive effect of technology to the acoustics of punching music venues, i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> good to be back here. >> rose: so tell me what this is. >> i mean it is part memoir. >> a bit of memoir stuff, not a lot but a little bit, it is mainly about music, how the context of music finds itself in, affects what the music turns out to be. >> rose: what do you mean by context? >> there is a lot of them. >> right. >> okay. and i didn't set out to write that, i started writing some essays and things and i realized, wow, this is what it is about that it could be the stage, performing on a stage, the fact that you have to do something live performing in front of other people and it could be the acoustics of the live venue, whether it is reverb brandt space like a cathedral r a little club in nashville .. it could be the finances of trying to be a musician, trying to be a composer and make a little of it and that narrows down and defines what you can reasonably do. you can have the same ambitions but they are going t going to k- they ar
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
them, but as far as economic trading relationships are concerned, material, in exchange for technology, in exchange even for political alliances, i always wondered about that. tavis: made the argument is because free enterprise and colonization sometimes goes hand in hand. in africa and parts of the world under the guise of free enterprise. >> unfortunately, it does not stand the test of argument. if you say it is a free market. then they must leave the african countries to seek the best conditions for their own development. there are similar aspects of chinese policy, backing some very villainess governments, but that does not mean we should repeat. tavis: the u.s. has been guilty of it as well. >> france, england, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggres
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 3:00pm PST
's the proud result of the workers' party's policy on science and technology. >> reporter: the last time they trade this back in april north korea's multistage rocket disintegrated a few minutes after takeoff. but this time it seems they got it right. the only pictures we've got come from the control room's big screen t.v. but we can see the rocket leave the launch pad and climb into the upper atmosphere. we're told they put a satellite, the shining star 3, into orbit. this country may not be able to feed its own people but its engineers can fire things into space. "it's made with our own technology and our own strength" says the director of the command center. the country's boyish looking supreme leader, kim jong-un, has disregard it had will of the international community and enhanced his own credentials with the military at home. some hope he'd take a more reformist approach one year after the death of his father, kim jong-il, but those hopes have been dashed, it seems. in south korea, protesters took to the streets burning flags and portraits. and the international community added it
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 7:00pm PST
on the nasdaq. the technology sector led the way, up eight tenths of a percent. the consumer discretionary sector added six tenths of a percent. the big tech names in the dow industrials weren't left out. intel had the biggest percentage gain of dow stocks. shares were up 1.6%. c.e.o. paul otellini said intel could manufacture semiconductors for other chipmakers "for the right types of products." so, queue the rumors about intel possibly making chips for apple. cisco systems moved up 1.4%. the move takes shares to their highest price since september. the top tech sector stock was akamai technologies. akamai helps speed up and manage online content and traffic. a new partnership with at&t led to today's rally. shares jumped 10% on heavy volume. analysts say the deal turns at&t from a competitor of akamai's to a customer, eliminating the rival from akamai's business. on the consumer side, starbucks was hot. first, the company said it will pay more taxes in britain in the next two years. yesterday, the company said it will open at least 1,500 new stores in the u.s. over the next five years. s
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 7:00pm PST
technologies also picked itself up from its yearly low, rising 3.2% today. travel web sites operator priceline.com hit the brakes in the consumer sector. shares fell 5% to a three-week low. investment bank deutsche banc cut its rating from "buy" to "hold," thinking priceline's competitors will get more aggressive. it was a trio of technology stocks leading the dow jones industrial average, including the worst dow stock so far this year, hewlett-packard. h-p-q shares closed up 2.6%. cisco systems is at its highest price since early may after gaining 2.4%. and microsoft moved up 1.8%. last week, it was at its lowest price of the year. uncle sam no longer wants to own a.i.g. late today, the treasury department announced it is looking to sell the remaining stock it got when it bailed out the insurance giant. the stock represents 16% of a.i.g. shares were down 2.3% during the regular session and lost another 1.5% in extended hours trading. selling these shares will mean the government made a profit with its bailout. after this stock sale, the government will continue to own warrants, allowing it to
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 6:00pm PST
. >> brown: indeed, communication and new technology, the internet and social media, became a passion for ai wei wei. beginning in 2006 and lasting three years, he wrote a blog about art, life and politics before it was shut down by the government. he now spends hours a day online and remains very active on twitter though it's blocked within china. >> the internet is such a beautiful miracle for the society here because we are so living under very restricted dictatorship. you know, we are still dealing with a very restricted control on freedom of expression. the internet is the only vehicle for people to even sense there's another person who shares the same idea or who can offer different information about what has happened. that is the foundation for civil society. >> brown: a very serious side and still the playful side. the work of some 3200 river crabs made of porcelain. why? well the chinese term for river crab sounds like the word for harmonious. that in turn has become eye ronic internet slang in china referring to official censorship. ai wei wei continues to make museum ready objects
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm PST
and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other side is willing to give. then they submit plans they know the other side will reject. and then, only then, a deal is struck. maybe, but not yet. and with every day that passes, congress and the white house edge close to raising taxes, cutting spending and sending the nation back into recession. here are the arguments -- >> the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about, for example
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 4:00pm PST
. >> modern technology has given us medical advances once never imagined. britain is starting an ambitious new project. 100,000 patients with serious diseases are going to have their dna fully ampped in the hope that will help doctors develop new treatments. it is the first country to launch such an extensive database. our correspondent has the details. >> cancer happens when our dna mutates and our normal cells grow unchecked. mapping the mutations that drive cancer is already happening. for the first time, it will be offered to huge numbers of patients. who will carry out the sequencing and analysis over the next five years has not been worked out, but the prime minister on a visit to cambridge said the project has the potential to transform cancer treatment. >> the dna database can help us to do that, but we also want to keep britain at the forefront of biotechnology, pharmaceutical industry. we can be a world leader. >> at the heart of each human cell is a bundle of tightly packed dna lounge in the spiral shaped of the double helix. there are 3 billion pairs of chemical code. by comparing
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 12:00am PST
on the idea that technology is the only answer to our military challenges, that we are only going to fight certain kinds of wars in the future. you know, we say we would never fight another counterinsurgency after vietnam but guess what, we did, and as i look back at all of the times we have used military force since vietnam, when it comes to predicting where we will use our military next, we have a perfect record. >> rose: we are always wrong. >> i have never gotten it right, not once. >> rose: why? >> because the world is unpredictable. and so my mantra when i was secretary was, we need a force that is equipped and trained to provide the maximum possible versatility across the broadest possible range of conflict, because we can't predict what the next conflict will be like and, therefore, we have to train and have as much flexibility and versatility as possible. we can't just prepare for one kind of conflict. > >> rose: you also have said, i think on leaving, that i don't want to be secretary of state when you are fighting these kind of ground wars, you know, with increasing budget deman
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 3:00pm PST
, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking with the top house republican, and as a year-end deadline moved even closer. the president took his public campaign for a deficit deal on his terms to the daimler diesel plant in redford michigan. >> if congress doesn't act soon meaning in the next few weeks, starting on january 1, everybody is going to see their income taxes go up. it's true. y'all don't like that? >> no! woodruff: instead, mr. obama again pressed for raising tax rates on the top two percent of incomes. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 7:00pm PST
hospital that's using technology to do just that. and the economic and investment outlook for 2013-- we talk with gary thayer from wells fargo advisors. >> tom: we want to remind you about a special guest on nbr later this week. nbr founding co-anchor paul kangas will join us on thursday night, december 6. we'll talk about the markets, and he'll answer some of your questions. that's this thursday, december 6. you can submit your questions on facebook or twitter at b-i-z-r-p-t. >> susie: it's beginning to look a lot like christmas here at the nyse. just moments ago, the big board held its 89th annual christmas tree lighting. this year's tree is a 45-foot norway spruce, and if history is any guide, it will be one of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 7:00pm PST
to 691 million shares; just over 1.9 billion shares on the nasdaq. the technology sector was back in the leader position, up 1.4%. health care and telecommunications were up 1%. with the tech sector up, apple was helping out as it rebounded a little from its recent sell- off, but on lighter volume. shares rose 2.1%. piper jaffray's apple analyst predicts a more steady stock rally next year, and he's sticking with his $900 price target. it was a pair of business software firms that had the best percentage gains inside the tech sector. citrix systems jumped 4.8%, closing at a two-month high. salesforce.com gained 4.2% to close at a new high. meantime, two big semiconductor makers were in focus as they work to meet the competition intel gained 2.8% to a one-month high. it said it is on track to launch a new generation of semiconductors for smart phones and tablets, a market where intel has been lagging. texas instruments gained 4% after it pushed up the high end of its profit forecast for this quarter. with the government pricing its sale at $32.50 per share, the stock rallied close
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 12:00am PST
to and from was one of the most unusual parts because they operate using technology that hasn't really been used before. >> rose: i should set this up for the audience at home who hasn't obviously seen the movie. this is a story how they would lead him to pakistan and a story about how they made a decision to go in and either capture or kill osama bin laden. there's are two different stories. >> and there's the story. >> there's a third story when they go in and actually do it. >> two for the price of one. >> rose: talk about the c.i.a. aspect of this. how long did it take them to get on the trail that would lead them somewhere? because we know that after 9/11 i mean they were all kinds of things going on with american national security people to get somebody to give some information as to where osama bin laden was, to get their hands on osama bin laden. >> well, i mean my humble opinion, mark did an extraordinary job of reporting this and then out of the reporting turning this into an incredibly dramatic screen play. i'm the recipient of that trying to transform those pages into a screen
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm PST
on stage with president obama, it wasn't about television ads or whiz bang turnout technologies, it was about fundamental republican ideas versus fundamental democratic ideas. it was about lower taxes or higher taxes less government or more government, more freedom and less freedom. and republican ideals mitt romney carried the day. stevens was a controversial figure throughout the campaign. he drew criticism externally for being too cautious in defining his candidate and internally for being a sometimes divisive and material figure. in august a new republic profiled him as friendship with mitt romney. the article was published under the title the square and the flare. i've known stuart stevens for a long time and i am pleased to have him here at this table this one of his first conversations about the politics 2012, who won, who lost and why. thank you for coming. >> well i can clarify that. we lost. >> rose: but when did you think you were going to lose? >> we're always very realistic about it contrary to some roorts. we thought we had a good chance to win. after the storm i
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 10:00pm PST
! >> fortunately, now, with the technology in helmets and the amount of padding that they have and... it's basically like your head's sitting in a basket, even to the point where if, i hit someone really hard, it doesn't... it doesn't really hurt. ( whistle blows ) >> knock him out! >> a helmet is not going to prevent a concussion. >> next guy. good group, good group. >> the helmet design of today and the past has always been about keeping the skull from getting a fracture, not a concussion. just because you have a helmet on doesn't make you invincible. and that's the... danger that we've got to change the culture on. >> get it out, let's go! >> narrator: with the new awareness about head injuries, the coaches at shiloh say they are more careful. but their big loss to trinity only strengthened their resolve to play a more physical game. >> we're going to run you all dead. we're killing y'all, i'm just telling you. >> we are aware of concussions, we are aware of head injuries, and we take that very serious. but you can't play worried about getting hurt. trinity taught us that if i hit you
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 6:00pm PST
provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. the nation's governors met with president obama today about what they need to see in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal.
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)